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From Nationalism to Globalism: Toward a Korean History Narrative Beyond Ideological Contention image
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From Nationalism to Globalism: Toward a Korean History Narrative Beyond Ideological Contention

Djun Kil Kim
Samsung Korean Studies Program Professorial & Research Chair at the University of Asia & the Pacific

WHAT: KORUS Forum lecture & light Korean refreshments
WHENTuesday, March 24 @ 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. 
WHERE: Korea-U.S. Science Cooperation Center (1952 Gallows Rd. Suite 330, Vienna, VA 22182)
HOW: Details and Free RSVP (required) below. 

Presented by the Korean Cultural Center Washington, D.C., the Korea Foundation, and the US-Korea Institute at SAIS.

Note: this evening program will be presented in Korean language only; an English-language version of the same lecture will be delivered at 12:30 p.m. on the same day, March 24, at the US-Korea Institute at SAIS, Johns Hopkins University (Lunch provided; location: 1717 Massachusetts Ave NW Bernstein-Offit Building, Room 500; RSVP/Contact: Sarabeth Craig, scraig10@jhu.edu).

SYNOPSIS:
Korean modern history remains defined by two pivotal experiences of the Korean people in the 20th century: Japanese colonial occupation and the post-World War II national division. Yet today there are still divergent, competing narratives that interpret the significance of these traumatic but probationary periods, even within an individual nation among the political left and right. In the Republic of Korea, for example, the left and right share common political ancestry of conventional anti-colonial nationalism, but differ in anti-communist or anti-intervention ideologies. In order to seek a more comprehensive understanding of contemporary Korean history, this lecture pursues a new narrative of Korea developing and transforming through the influence of various global civilization doctrines such as Buddhism, Neo-Confucianism, Christianity, Communism, and American functionalism, throughout its history.

Djun Kil Kim has been teaching and researching as the Samsung Korean Studies Program Professorial & Research Chair at the University of Asia & the Pacific in Manila, Philippines since 2009. After a career as a journalist for major Korean dailies and in a wide array of foreign mission posts conducting public diplomacy for the Republic of Korea, Kim taught Korean history and civilization, including at Yonsei University in Seoul, Brigham Young University in the United States, and Stockholm University in Sweden. In 2004 Kim authored The History of Korea, a comprehensive Korean history book in English published by Greenwood Press. In 2011, he received the Global Korea Award from the Council on Korean Studies at Michigan State University and in 2012 was awarded Diplomat of The Year 2011 by the Youngsan Foundation, affiliated with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Korea. He obtained his B.A. and M.A. in sociology from Seoul National University in 1962 and 1964 respectively.